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Dave’s not home

 

Many of you may remember the old Cheech and Chong Skit, Dave’s not home, from the 1970’s.

Joking aside, despite the bad rap for cannabis, patients are seeking it out as an alternative for a number of health conditions.

Cannabis has been cultivated and consumed virtually since the beginning of recorded history. Cannabis-based textiles dating to 7,000 B.C.E have been recovered in northern China, and the plant’s use as a medicinal and mood altering agent dates back nearly as far.

Scientists have conducted extensive testing on the cannabis found by archaeologists, affirming that ancient cultures cultivated cannabis for pharmaceutical, psychoactive, and religious purposes.

Many of the scientific conclusions from  modern research directly conflicts with the federal government’s stance that cannabis is a highly dangerous substance worthy of criminalization.

What does the research say?

Cannabis studies have shown efficacy in the following conditions:

Alzheimer’s Disease: http://www.jneurosci.org/content/25/8/1904.abstract

ALS:  http://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/archive/index.php/t-557.html

Chronic Pain: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18403272

Diabetes Mellitus: http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/2/1/e000494.full

Dystonia: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11835452?dopt=Abstract

Epilepsy: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4157067/

Fibromyalgia: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3080871/?tool=pubmed

GI Disorders: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21795981

Gliomas/Cancer: http://www.fasebj.org/content/17/3/529.full

Hepatitis C: http://journals.lww.com/eurojgh/pages/articleviewer.aspx?year=2006&issue=10000&article=00005&type=abstract

HIV: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20874519

Huntington’s Disease: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1839644

Hypertension: http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/110/14/1996.full

Incontinence: http://www.ukcia.org/research/CBEForMSBladderDysfunction.pdf

MRSA: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/np8002673

Multiple Sclerosis: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17086912

Osteoporosis: http://www.pnas.org/content/103/3/696.abstract

Pruritus: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16324422?dopt=Abstract

Rheumatoid Arthritis: http://rheumatology.oxfordjournals.org/content/45/1/50.abstract

Sleep Apnea: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12071539?dopt=Abstract

Tourette’s Syndrome: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11951146


Cannabis has four main routes of administration:

  1. Smoking
  2. Vaporizing
  3. Eating
  4. Topical

 

There are a number of chemicals in cannabis that can have a therapeutic effect. One of the most common is CBD, which has been shown to reduce pain and seizures and can be isolated from the plant so as to limit the psychoactive effects.

Most commercially available products typically list the proportion of sativa, which gives you the “high” feeling and Indica, which can reduce pain and increase relaxation.

 

My intent with this weeks blog is not to present cannabis as a cure all, but to provide a resource for those with chronic conditions who either don’t like the side effects of conventional medications commonly used to treat the above conditions, and/or are searching for alternatives.

 

Not all of the above conditions are on the approve list of medicinal cannabis use in Washington. Please see:  http://app.leg.wa.gov/rcw/default.aspx?cite=69.51A.010

 

Disclaimer: I am not advocating self-medicating. Please consult with a physician if you are interested in medicinal uses for cannabis.

About the Author

Dr. Geoff LecovinNaturopathic Physician/Chiropractor/Acupuncturist/Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist/Corrective Exercise Specialist/Performance Enhancement Specialist/Certified Sports Nutritionist/View all posts by Dr. Geoff Lecovin

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